On the place of empathy in social justice movements

It's unfortunately very common for people to weaponize empathy -- to call for empathy in order to tell people seeking justice to be quieter. Due to this frequent occurrence, I think it is common for people to view practicing empathy as antithetical to achieving justice. In this essay, I argue that the act of truly practicing empathy is much different than what is prescribed by many people who call for empathy, and that truly practicing empathy dovetails with (rather than opposes) justice.

Book: Nonviolent Communication (2003)

For people wondering about how to engage in difficult, high-stakes conversations about politics without losing their cool, deeply empathize with others, and maybe change someone's mind, I think this book, Nonviolent Communication, is a good place to start. This book explains an empathetic way of communicating (both speaking and listening) that make difficult conversations easier and more productive.

Choose both: the false dichotomies of the center

Some people say identity politics cost Democrats the election. Some people have a lot to say of the essentialness of identity politics to leftist politics but are much happier if Democrats would stop talking about economic issues. I think people should be highly suspicious of both types. In this post, I discuss the connections between social justice and economic justice and why if you care about one, you should care about both.