Mapping the Political Space – Part III: Enlightenment and Romantic Aesthetics

As part of my series on mapping the political space, I talk about two intellectual periods, the Enlightenment and the Romantic movement, that embody and inspire two clusters of aesthetics. I go over how both of these aesthetics can be used for good or ill, and discuss how these aesthetics are adopted by various political ideologies/camps.

Private Government (2017)

This book carefully lays out an argument that workplaces are authoritarian and that the most vocal proponents of liberty today often are unable to recognize this fact. This book goes into the reason why, and shows that recognizing this fact would dramatically change the politics of libertarians.

Genteel racism

For some reason, people have a mental image of racism as violent, ignorant, lower-class, crude, crass, and irrational. I talk about what racist beliefs look like when they're held by genteel, polite, educated, upper class, scientifically-minded people, and why we should care about this form of racism.

Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970)

How do you teach a student from an oppressed class without the wider oppression of society being mirrored in the teacher/student relationship? This book describes how control and oppression work, and argues why it is important to take care that education helps people imagine and create a world with less oppression, rather than merely embodies and reinforces oppressive structures. To accomplish this, the author proposes a pedagogy built around the practice of education as dialogue and the practice of problem-posing.